Ch 8 - Municipal Services and Infrastructure

Ch 8 - Municipal Services and Infrastructure

1. Introduction

Population and housing growth often results in an increase in the demand placed on municipal services and infrastructure systems. Careful planning for this growth, from a municipal services standpoint, is important in order to ensure that an adequate level of service is provided to residents and businesses at a manageable cost level. Additionally, due to Conway’s attractiveness as a tourist and retail destination, municipal service and infrastructure capacity and fiscal planning must also take into account the increased demand for services created by the influx of seasonal residents and tourists.

This chapter examines Conway’s municipal services from the perspective of facility and equipment needs of the various town departments to support existing and projected demand. Additionally, staffing levels are also discussed for each respective department The facilities examined in this evaluation include the Town Hall, police services, fire and emergency services, library, public works and the school district. Map 8-1, located at the end of the chapter, identifies the locations of each of the facilities as well as the boundaries of various fire districts/precincts. In addition, the capacity and condition of several public infrastructure systems are also described. These systems include water, sewer, electric, natural gas and telecommunications.

Much of the information presented in this chapter was obtained through interviews with town department heads and representatives from each respective public infrastructure system. Where applicable, recent studies of infrastructure systems were reviewed and are cited within this chapter.

2. Summary of Findings and Conclusions

The following points summarize the municipal service and infrastructure findings and conclusions presented within this chapter. Additionally, various implications associated with Conway’s municipal services and infrastructure are discussed.

In terms of Conway’s various facilities and buildings, many are in generally good condition considering the age and continual use. Specific infrastructure and buildings findings include:

  • The Conway Town Hall is in generally good condition. According to the Town Manager, building systems and space requirements need some attention. Specifically, approximately 1,500 square feet of additional space is needed for storage (with a particular need for secure vault storage), meetings, and small office areas.
  • Based on interviews with each of the Fire Chiefs, most of Conway’s Fire District’s/Precinct’s have adequate facilities with the exception of the East Conway Precinct which requires upgrades and renovations to its existing fire station.
  • With the exception of Pine Tree Elementary School, all schools within the Conway School District are at or above enrollment capacity and will require upgrades, renovations and additions to the existing buildings.
  • The Conway Recreation Center is in need of upgrades and renovations.

Based on recently completed public water and sewer master plans for the North Conway Water Precinct (NCWP) and the Conway Village Fire District (CVFD), and interviews with Precinct/District representatives, water and sewer findings include:

  • Connecting the CVFD water treatment and distribution system to NCWP’s system provides the most overall benefit to the town. This strategy is recommended in the CVFD Water Master Plan (CDM, 2002)[1] and is the most cost effective solution to several distribution and treatment issues facing the District. Connecting the water system will enable the CVFD to accomplish the following: meet all Insurance Services Office (ISO) requirements; improve water quality; provide a back-up supply source and additional storage; and overall improved system reliability. Necessary improvements with this connection include:
    • Connection to NCWP’s Pine Hill Tank;
    • Construction of a new 12-inch diameter main on Route 16 (north of the Saco River);
    • Construction of a new 12-inch diameter main on Route 16 (from the storage tanks to the Cranmore Shores); and
    • Local improvements on Washington Street, Haynesville Avenue and Tasker Hill Road
  • The CVFD is completing a feasibility and implementation study to evaluate the financial and operations aspects of a water and wastewater interconnection between the District and the North Conway Water Precinct. If the study concludes that interconnection is the best course of action, the consultant to the CVFD suggests that the following steps should be taken:
    • Develop an inter-municipal agreement between the precincts setting forth the terms and conditions of the system interconnections, connection fees, and user rates; and
    • Continue to seek outside funding sources for needed system capital improvements.
  • If an acceptable agreement can be reached between the CVFD and the NCWP, and all wastewater flows are connected to the NCWP system the following improvements would be necessary:
    • Construction of a pump station and wastewater collection system north of the Saco River to convey flows to North Conway;
    • The installation of a new wastewater interceptor to convey flows from the existing service area to the new pump station on the north side of the Saco River;
    • Upgrading the aeration system for the existing wastewater treatment plant as an interim improvement before the connection is made to NCWP.

Based on the findings and conclusions presented throughout this chapter, implications about how Conway could change in the future include:

  • The continued growth of enrollment within the entire Conway School District has placed considerable pressure on the town’s educational infrastructure. Pending the outcome of the Conway School District’s AREA withdrawal study, a comprehensive facilities plan should be developed by the District in order to address the town’s educational infrastructure needs over the next ten years.
  • Although Conway enjoys the benefits of having experienced and dedicated professionals using some of the best equipment in the County, there may be opportunities to better utilize fire protection resources. Based on interviews with each of the Fire Chiefs, it appears that the town as a whole could improve its fire protection services if the five separate fire districts/precincts were coordinated, at the very least, on an administrative and fiscal basis. At a bare minimum, purchasing agreements, drafted in the form of memoranda of understanding, should be initiated to purchase similar products, services, and equipment used by each of the Precincts/Districts. Although coordination has been attempted in the past, the potential administrative and fiscal advantages attained by an integrated fire protection system could be significant and therefore should be revisited. It may be most beneficial for the town to hire an outside consultant to conduct an examination for opportunities of coordination and cooperation among Conway’s fire and emergency service providers.
  • In order to reduce overlapping zoning requirements and bureaucratic formalities, the Town of Conway’s Zoning Ordinance should be amended to include the Kearsarge Lighting District’s Zoning Ordinance.
  • The CVFD Interconnection Feasibility Study is anticipated to address NCWP residents and property owners’ concern that water and wastewater expansion to areas outside the Precinct may use existing capacity and limit future connection opportunities within the Precinct. If the Study determines that expansion can be done by using surplus capacity and without future limitations to existing service areas, both NCWP and CVFD should work with Precinct residents and property owners to inform them of the advantages of this interconnection to the larger community. Additionally, NCWP should continue to evaluate potential future funding eligibility issues if additional revenues are collected from new service areas outside the Precinct.

    The Town of Conway Selectmen should work with both the CVFD and the NCWP by informing residents and property owners in both service areas about the advantages of inter-connected water and wastewater systems in terms of resource protection and future economic opportunities; developing funding solutions that recognize the difference in tax bases and financing capabilities between the two service areas; and accessing state and federal funding sources that are accessible only through the town (i.e. CDBG and CDAG grants).

3. Town Hall

Existing Services – The Conway Town Hall building is located on Route 302 in Center Conway. The building houses many of the town’s administrative departments including:

  • General Assistance
  • Finance Department
  • Town Clerk and Tax Collector
  • Assessment Department
  • Planning and Zoning Department
  • Treasurer
  • Engineering and Public Works Department
  • Building Department
  • Town Manager.

In addition to the administrative departments, the building contains a meeting room used by various town committees including the Board of Selectmen. A total of sixteen employees work within the administrative departments in the Town Hall.

The Town Hall was built in the 1870s and sits on a site of approximately two acres. The wood framed structure contains two stories for a total of approximately 5,400 square feet. The town’s administrative functions are located on the first and second floors. The first floor contains all of the town’s administrative departments with the exception of the Finance, Planning, Engineering, and Building Departments which are located on the second floor. A meeting room is also located on the second floor.

The Town Hall is handicap accessible with a wheelchair ramp located at the rear of the building. Parking is provided by approximately twenty spaces which are located behind the building.

Needs Assessment – According to information provided by the Town Manager, the building is in good overall condition and is structurally sound. The building’s condition has, however, deteriorated somewhat over the past few years as a result of deferred maintenance.

According to the Town Manager, although the Town Hall is generally in good repair, building systems need to be upgraded and there is a shortage of space. Needed improvements include HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) upgrades and the installation of a fire suppression system. Energy efficient windows are also needed as well as some minor remodeling of the first floor. The remodeling will allow increased visibility and access, thereby improving safety and security for staff and clients. All of these improvements were addressed in the FY 2002 budget.

Table 8-1. Estimated Town Hall Space Requirements
Conway, New Hampshire
Space Type SF Req.
Storage 100
Copy room 200
Small meeting room 150
Computer room 100
Break room 150
Interns, checklist 200
Assessors help 100
Unspecified Expansion 500
Total 1,500
Source: Town of Conway

From an overall perspective, the building provides adequate space for users and employees within the facility. While not critical at the moment, space needs will have to be addressed within the next five to ten years. As shown in Table 8-1, space needs include a variety of small offices, an employee break room, and storage. While some additional space may be created through remodeling, without the acquisition of additional building space, this issue will remain outstanding. The Town Manager estimates that approximately 1,500 square feet of additional space is needed.

4. Community Centers

The Town of Conway has one community center[2], the Conway Recreation Center, located in Center Conway east of the Town Hall.

Existing Services

Conway Recreation Center – The Conway Recreation Center is located on Route 302 in Center Conway approximately one mile east of the Conway Town Hall. The main part of the building, formerly used as a school, was constructed in the late nineteenth century is a single story (with basement) wood framed structure. The building is the headquarters for the Conway Recreation Department. Adjacent to the building is a brick gymnasium facility which was constructed in the 1980s. Connected to the main structure, located next to the gymnasium, is a small single story building which houses various administrative offices. Surrounding the complex are approximately five acres of property that contain sports fields, play structures and parking facilities.

The main structure is divided into several rooms which accommodate Recreation Department offices and space for recreation programs and events. According to the Town Manager, there are a number of surplus offices in the building that are currently leased to community groups. Whether these offices will continue to be leased to outside parties is currently undetermined.

Needs Assessment – Overall the complex is in good structural condition. However, there are a number of upgrades and renovations needed within the buildings. The Town Manager anticipates that the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system needs to be upgraded, as well as the replacement of the roof and windows. Furthermore, the existing play structure may need to be upgraded as it was constructed with wooden poles. The Town Manager anticipates that the renovations, upgrades and replacements need to be completed within the next five years. A cost estimate has not yet been prepared for the needed repairs.

5. Police Services

Existing Services – Conway’s police services are administered from the police station located at the intersection of Route 302 and East Conway Road. The building, which was constructed in 1988, is a single story wood framed structure with brick veneer. According to construction plans, the building contains approximately 8,400 square feet which is entirely occupied by the police department. It should be noted that a second structure, the Northern Carroll County District Courthouse located next to the police station, was constructed at the same time as the police station. The Town of Conway currently owns the courtroom structure and leases it to Carroll County for a period of twenty years. Upon expiration of the lease, the building will become the property of the County. Although the courthouse is technically owned by the town and is on town property, existing services and needs assessment information will only be provided for the police station.

Police operations within the building include administrative offices, two evidence rooms, conference room, dispatch room, lunch room, equipment room/armory, records/archives room, and seven detention cells. The west side of the building contains two garage stalls. The garage stalls are designed to serve a multitude of uses including a secure means of bringing detainees into the adjoining lock-up cells for short-term detention, as well as for storage, minor vehicle maintenance and impounding evidence. Full-time staffing for the department includes 21 sworn patrol officers, two administrative assistants and seven dispatch personnel. The dispatch operations housed at the police station are exclusively for the police department. However, a recent upgrade of the police radio and dispatch system has enabled the Conway Police Department to link with the Conway Village Fire Department’s communication system. Having the systems linked provides backup radio and dispatch services for either department in the event that their system should go off-line. The entire town of Conway is covered by enhanced “911” service for both fire and police protection.

The Department’s capital needs are primarily associated with regular vehicle replacement. The inventory currently includes six marked cruisers, two unmarked/semi-marked cruisers which are used by the Chief and Detectives, two four-by-four Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs), one crime scene van, and three bicycles.

Needs Assessment – Overall, the police station is in very good condition and the Police Chief does not anticipate any major structural changes for at least ten years. The only short-term building requirement that needs attention is the lack of storage space for records and archives. The current space presently being utilized for record and archive storage will need to be reconfigured to accommodate additional records and files.

From a personnel standpoint, with the addition of two new sworn officers during 2002, staffing levels appear to be appropriate for providing service during seasonal fluctuations in population experienced within the town. There could potentially be a need for part-time officers to assist full-time officers during the summer months. However, the expense associated with training officers justifies hiring only full-time officers.

In terms of vehicular requirements, outside of regular rotation of police vehicles, there are no planned additions to the current vehicle fleet over the next few years.

6. Fire and Emergency Services

Fire protection and emergency services for the town of Conway are administered through five separate and distinct fire departments. As shown in Map 8-1 at the end of the chapter, all of the departments function within the respective precinct or district that includes: North Conway Water/Fire Precinct; Center Conway Fire Precinct; Conway Village Fire District; East Conway Fire Precinct; and the Redstone Fire District. However, the North Conway Precinct, the Conway Village District, and the Center Conway Fire Precinct serve communities outside of Conway including the Towns of Bartlett, Albany, and Eaton. A series of formal and informal service and/or mutual agreements have also been organized between each of the districts/precincts and communities outside of Conway.

All of the fire districts/precincts have the authority to raise revenues through taxation of properties within each respective district or precinct. Some of the districts/precincts use other fund raising efforts, such as raffles and social events, to complement their regular appropriations.

Fire protection and emergency personnel for each of the respective districts/precincts include a combination of full-time and call (part-time) staff, as well as additional administrative support staff in some cases. North Conway and Conway Village are the only districts which employ full-time staff (Chief/Assistant Chief). The remainder of the positions in each respective district are filled by call staff which are available on an as needed basis. A total of thirty pieces of major equipment (vehicles, etc.) are currently in use by the individual districts/precincts for fire and emergency duties throughout the town. Table 8-2 provides a summary of major equipment and personnel for each of Conway’s five fire districts/precincts.

Table 8-2. Fire Department Equipment and Personnel Summary: 2002
Town of Conway
  North Conway Center Conway Conway Village East Conway Redstone Total
Major Equipment 6 6 10 5 3 30
Personnel, Full-Time 2.5 0 2 0 0 4.5
Personnel, Part-Time/On Call 40 20 43 20 20 143
Source: Conway Fire District/Precinct Fire Chiefs

As each of Conway’s fire districts/precincts are autonomous units, existing services and the assessment of needs is provided on an individual basis with information concerning existing facilities based on discussions with each district/precinct’s Chief.

Existing Services

Center Conway Fire Precinct – The Center Conway Fire Precinct’s station is located in Center Conway on Route 302 adjacent to the Conway Town Hall. The building is a single story structure that was built in 1990. There is approximately 5,000 square feet of building space which includes three garage bays for vehicles, an office, meeting room, kitchen and dispatch area. The facility is located on approximately one acre of land.

The building is owned by the Center Conway Fire Precinct and responds to calls in Center Conway (approximately 12,000 acres or 19 square miles) and the Town of Eaton and non-precinct areas in Conway Village. The Precinct’s staff includes twenty call firefighters.

Vehicles presently located at this station include two fire engines, an ambulance, a tanker and a reel truck which holds 2,200 feet of hose. The Precinct provides fire protection, rescue services and first response emergency medical services (EMS).

North Conway Water/Fire Precinct – The North Conway Water/Fire Precinct’s station is located at the Norcross Circle off of Route 16 near the Conway Scenic Railway in North Conway. The building is a single story structure of brick veneer construction that was constructed in 1963. The building contains approximately 7,200 square feet. In addition to the four garage bays, the structure contains office space for the Chief/Assistant Chief and administrative staff, meeting/lunch room, and storage facilities in the basement. The structure is located on approximately one acre of land.

The North Conway Fire Precinct’s jurisdiction is approximately thirty-six square miles and incorporates all of North Conway, portions of the Town of Bartlett, Hales Location and some non-precinct areas. Staff at the Precinct includes a full-time Chief and Assistant Chief, administrative support person and forty call firefighters.

Vehicles within the Precinct’s inventory include two engines, a tanker, ladder truck, EMS/rescue vehicle, and one pickup support truck. The Precinct is well equipped and provides a wide array of fire and emergency services including fire protection, EMS, search and rescue, and water rescue.

East Conway Fire Precinct – The East Conway Fire Precinct’s station is located on East Conway Road in East Conway. The building is a single story wood framed structure that was constructed in 1900 and sits on approximately one acre of land. The building is the smallest of Conway’s fire stations at approximately 2,600 square feet. The structure has two garage bays and a small office and has experienced several renovations and upgrades over the past one hundred years. The most recent renovation included raising the building and replacing the foundation. In addition to the station, the Precinct owns the East Conway Grange Hall and uses the facility for Fire Precinct meetings, as well as a source of revenue through renting the building for local social events.

The East Conway Fire Precinct’s jurisdiction incorporates all of East Conway which is approximately defined as the area east of Center Conway and west and north of Route 302. Members of the Precinct staff, including the Fire Chief, are all on call. Vehicles within the Precinct’s inventory include two engines, a tanker, snorkel truck carrying 2,700 feet of 4-inch hose and a utility truck. Services provided by the Precinct are limited to fire protection services.

Conway Village Fire District – The Conway Village Fire District’s station is located on Route 16 in the heart of Conway Village. The building is a one and a half story structure that was built in 1999 – the newest fire station within Conway. The structure contains approximately 15,500 square feet of space with four garage bays and a host of other facilities including an office, lunch room, bunk room, dispatch area, laundry and shower facilities. The building also contains an auxiliary source of electrical power. The structure is located on approximately one acre of land.

The Conway Village District’s jurisdiction incorporates all of Conway Village and southern portions of West Side Road, eastern portions of the Kancamangus Highway (Route 112), and the Town of Albany. The Department has a formal mutual aid agreement with the Town of Madison. Ambulance service includes all the areas listed and the entire southern half of Conway to the Maine/New Hampshire state line. District staff includes a fulltime Chief, an Assistant Chief, a part-time administrative assistant, and 42 call staff.

The District has a varied vehicle and equipment inventory including three engines, two ambulances, ladder truck, forestry truck, heavy rescue EMS vehicle, reel truck, EMS trailer, and one sport utility support vehicle. The wide array of vehicles and equipment allows the Precinct to perform fire protection, EMS, ambulance, search and rescue, and confined space rescue services.

Redstone Fire District – The Redstone Fire District station is located on Route 302 in the Village of Redstone. The building is a single story cinder block facility that was originally built in the 1950s. The structure has experienced additions and upgrades over the past forty years with the latest addition, a third garage bay, completed in 2000. The building site is approximately one acre with the structure being approximately 3,000 square feet in size.

The Redstone Fire District’s jurisdiction incorporates all of the village of Redstone – essentially an area adjacent to the North Conway, Conway Village and Center Conway service areas. The twenty members of the Precinct staff, including the Fire Chief, are all on call. The total vehicle inventory for the District includes two pumper trucks and one tanker truck which are used exclusively to provide fire protection services.

Needs Assessment – Center Conway Fire Precinct – As one of the newest fire stations within Conway, the structure has incorporated most of the features required by modern fire departments of a similar size. However, according to the Center Conway Fire Chief, the building lacks suitable laundry and shower facilities which are scheduled to be installed in 2002.

In terms of vehicle needs, the Precinct has no plans to add to their existing fleet of vehicles outside of regular vehicle replacement. It is anticipated that the Precinct’s tanker truck will have to be replaced within the next few years.

North Conway Fire Precinct – According to the Fire Chief, current space within the Precinct’s building is adequate. Future building expansions may be necessary to accommodate operational enhancements. In terms of equipment, the Chief anticipates that communications equipment in the form of radio dispatch and computer systems should be upgraded within the next few years. Although the Chief does not anticipate adding any new pieces of major equipment to the current inventory, the Precinct’s existing ladder truck will have to be replaced in the next several years.

East Conway Fire Precinct – The East Conway Precinct’s station has a number of issues related to building design. As with most stations, there is inadequate space to accommodate the office and training needs of the Precinct. The station could use another garage bay to accommodate potential future vehicle and equipment needs. Although a formal facilities plan has not been drafted, the Chief feels that these types of uses could be incorporated into the current structure through upgrades and additions. In terms of equipment and vehicles, the Chief feels that the Precinct will be able to provide fire protection services over the next five or more years with the current inventory of equipment and vehicles.

Conway Village Fire District – The Conway Village Fire District station is in good condition and functions very well according to the Chief. There is adequate space for staff, vehicles and equipment and the building is well sited with regard to the roadway.

Outside of regular upgrades of vehicles and equipment, there are no anticipated vehicle or equipment needs for the foreseeable future. For example, two new thermal imaging cameras have recently been purchased, as well new air packs. These additional equipment items should meet the District’s needs for the next few years.

Redstone Fire District – With the recent upgrades and additions to the existing station, the facility functions well and should not need major improvements for many years according to the Chief. There is also adequate space in the upgraded building to handle equipment and staff needs.

The Chief anticipates the necessity to add equipment for the District to provide non-transport ambulance service. This type of service provides immediate emergency medical attention to patients prior to the arrival of an ambulance. Although no new vehicles will be required for the new service, the Chief indicated that approximately $3,000 in medical equipment will be needed. Furthermore, the existing tanker truck will need to be replaced within the next few years as part of the District’s ongoing vehicle replacement program. A used tanker truck should be adequate to handle the District’s needs and it is estimated to cost approximately $40,000. Both the medical equipment and the tanker truck are items which have been budgeted as part of the District’s capital improvements program.

7. Library

Existing Services – The town’s municipal library is located at the corner of Route 16 and 302 in Conway Village. Library services are delivered from a two-level historic masonry building that was constructed in 1900 and comprises approximately 8,000 square feet. The structure is situated on approximately three acres of land. The history of the building is unique with initial funding for the construction of the structure being provided by a lawyer/philanthropist at the turn of the century. According to the Head Librarian, the main level was the only useable area within the building until 1984, when the basement was renovated. Parking is provided by fourteen spaces located behind the building.

The basement (lower level) houses the children’s section, meeting room (used primarily for children’s reading programs), a circulation desk, history (archives) room, mechanical room, washrooms, and a staff room. The structure is handicap accessible with wheelchair ramp facilities.

The upper level contains a reference desk, reference collection, book stack room, custodial room, and a New Hampshire/new book room. The “Great Hall”, which contains the reference desk and materials is the most architecturally impressive room within the building with high ceilings and ornate molding details. Both the upper and lower levels house a total of twenty computer terminals which provide high-speed internet access and library catalog information.

Library personnel consists of four full-time and five part-time staff. A total of ten volunteers assist with various library duties throughout the building. The facility is open for a total of fifty-seven hours per week Monday through Saturday. The library has an agreement with the Towns of Albany and Eaton in which their residents may use the facilities with the associated costs paid by each respective town. In addition to the Conway Public Library, there is a small private library of approximately 3,700 square feet located on Route 16 in North Conway Village. The North Conway Public Library is a privately funded facility that provides library services to all residents of Carroll County and Fryeburg, Maine. The library contains various reading materials as well as videos, audio materials and offers community programs such as children’s reading initiatives. Although the North Conway Public Library provides library services and infrastructure to the public, it is not directly associated or funded by the Town of Conway and will not be included in this needs assessment.

Needs Assessment – Structurally the building appears to be in good condition. A bond was also recently passed to construct an 8,000 square foot, two-level addition onto the east side of the existing structure. This addition will house a meeting room, children’s room, circulation desk, reference stacks and restroom facilities. The most beneficial component of the project will be the addition of much needed shelf and storage space for books and other materials. Construction of the library addition is scheduled to be completed by early 2004.

Another need identified by the Head Librarian was the lack of computer hardware support for the library’s computer network. Currently, computer hardware and software problems are handled in-house by library staff, which generally satisfies the needs of the system. However, demands on the existing and future computer infrastructure may require a computer technician to handle these issues. Although the Library would not require the assistance of this person on a full-time basis, it is anticipated that this position could be shared amongst all municipal administrative departments.

8. Public Works

The Public Works Department oversees a number of functions within the community which include: road maintenance; drainage system maintenance; public grounds maintenance (excluding school properties); municipal vehicle maintenance (including police and school vehicles); street light maintenance; solid waste collection and disposal; collection and processing of recyclable materials; and maintenance of some cemetery properties.

The public works garage is located on Route 302, across the street and adjacent to the Town Hall, and contains approximately ten acres. The site includes two garages, an office and a number of outbuildings for storage of various materials and goods. According to the Director of Public Works, the newest garage is a single story, wood and steel structure that was completed in 1990.

The second garage is a single story cinder block structure with the construction date unknown. It is estimated that each garage contains approximately 10,000 square feet. The office is a one and a half story, wood framed structure of approximately 1,000 square feet and is estimated to have been constructed around 1900.

Staffing for the Public Works Department consists of a total of twenty-two fulltime staff including: one Director; eleven road/grounds maintenance staff; seven solid waste and recycling staff; and three vehicle maintenance and service technicians. Typically, one seasonal grounds maintenance worker is added during the summer months. Since the Director of Public Works’ office is located within the Town Hall, the department shares administrative staff with other municipal departments located within that building.

The town’s solid waste facility is located on East Conway Road and consists of an operational landfill, a transfer station (located on a decommissioned landfill), dump store (store for unwanted but useable items), solid waste rolloff container area, and disposal areas for various bulky items (used tires, white goods, etc). The Public Works Director estimates that the landfill has approximately twenty-five years of capacity. Conway residents and commercial establishments are currently responsible for the collection and disposal of solid waste and recyclable materials with no municipal curbside collection service being offered.

Needs Assessment – The existing facilities at the public works yard are at or are quickly reaching capacity. With the town having to maintain an ever-increasing amount of road mileage (North-South Road for example), facilities will have to be upgraded and expanded to handle new equipment and staff. According to the Public Works Director, it is anticipated that garage and office facilities at the public works yard will have to be upgraded and expanded within the next few years if additional road maintenance responsibility is added to the system. An approximate amount of new building space required has not been determined.

In terms of staffing, the Department is currently in need of a full-time position which would be split between grounds maintenance and snowplow operation and is expected to require more staff over the next few years. As with the yard facilities, any additional road maintenance responsibility added to the town will require additional staff. The number of new staff required to handle the added road maintenance has not been determined.

9. School District

Existing Services

Table 8-3. Conway School District Educational Facilities - 2002
Town of Conway
Facility Grades Enrollment* Current Capacity
Level
Kennett Junior/Senior High 7-12   Above Capacity
Conway Elementary K-6 300 Above Capacity
John Fuller Elementary K-6 280 Capacity
Pine Tree Elementary K-6 268 Below Capacity
*Projected enrollment from promoting existing (2001) students
Source: Conway School District Annual Report - 2001

The Conway School District provides educational and special education services for students in kindergarten through the twelfth grade. The Conway School District is one of seven school districts (Albany, Bartlett, Conway, Chatham, Eaton, Hart’s Location, and Jackson) administered by School Administrative Unit #9. The District administers three elementary schools (Conway Elementary, Pine Tree Elementary, and John Fuller Elementary) and the Kennett Junior/Senior High School which houses grades seven and eight (Junior High) and nine to twelve (Senior High School). Tables 8-3 provides a listing of these facilities along with their most recent enrollment levels and approximate capacity level.

An analysis of historic enrollment estimates over the past ten years for each of the District’s schools reveals that, generally, enrollment has been steadily increasing for Kennett Junior/Senior High School and steadily decreasing for all of the elementary schools.

Currently, the District has a total of 12 administrative staff, 193 teachers/certified instructors, 102 paraprofessional staff, and 44 support personnel (cooks, maintenance, custodians and bus drivers) for a total staff of 351.

Needs Assessment – Due to the potential of Conway’s withdrawal from the Conway Authorized Regional Enrollment Area (AREA) – a regional tuition cooperative formed in 1987 among the towns of Albany, Bartlett, Conway, Eaton, Freedom, Jackson, Madison and Tamworth – a formal review of the District’s facilities has not been completed. A plan for withdrawal, which was developed by the Conway Withdrawal Study Committee, from the AREA has been sent to the State Department of Education for review. From a facilities and infrastructure perspective, the approval for withdrawal from the AREA agreement is a major determinant of future facilities requirements for the Conway School District. As the withdrawal from the AREA agreement is yet undetermined, information on the overall facilities needs of the District is uncertain. Similarly, reliable enrollment projections for the entire district are not available. However, regardless of the withdrawal situation, there are a number of upgrades and improvements required at each of the District’s facilities. The following presents an overview of current facilities needs, recent upgrades and potentially needed improvements.

Kennett – Kennett Junior/Senior High School contains grades seven through twelve as well as a vocational training component. The school is located on Route 16 in Conway Village. The facility was constructed in 1923 and has experienced additions in 1938, 1956, 1963, and 1978. According to the SAU #9 Superintendent, portions of the school are in good structural condition. There are, however, portions of the school that are in need of significant repairs. For example, the physical education facility is in need of major structural upgrades. Furthermore, the “quilt-like” program of building additions to the main structure over the decades has created problems with wheelchair accessibility in certain sections of the structure, as well as significant parking issues. Traffic circulation issues are another problem with entrance and egress from the facility creating circulation problems on-site, as well as congestion on neighboring streets.

From a facility’s capacity standpoint, the building is above capacity in terms of total enrollment. The capacity issues may be relieved somewhat due to steady declines within the District’s elementary schools. It is apparent, however, that a detailed evaluation of the buildings at Kennett is needed.

Conway Elementary – The Conway Elementary School contains grades kindergarten through six. The school is located on Main Street in Conway Village. The facility was constructed in the 1950s with renovations and an addition completed in 1978. Overall, the building is in good condition. According to the Superintendent, the facility is above its designed enrollment capacity and currently has a portable classroom to address this issue. In order to address the capacity issue, the facility needs to have more specialized space added to accommodate specialty education needs and support staff. Specialized needs typically includes space for uses not incorporated in the building’s original design such as computer rooms, office space, nursing space, guidance councilor space, etc.

John Fuller Elementary – The John Fuller Elementary School contains grades kindergarten through six. The school is located on Pine Street next to the SAU #9 administrative offices. The building was constructed in the 1950s and has had renovations and additions completed in 1978 and 1990.

The facility is at or near enrollment capacity and, like the Conway Elementary School, requires additional specialized space.

Pine Tree Elementary School – The Pine Tree Elementary School contains grades kindergarten through six. The school is located on Mill Street in Center Conway, approximately one mile south of the Conway Town Hall. The facility is the newest addition to the Conway School District with the building being constructed in 1990.

As shown in Table 8-3, Pine Tree Elementary is below enrollment capacity and has no pressing building requirements. However, improvement and upgrading of the school’s recreation fields is necessary. These improvements are not likely to happen over the next few years as the site does not have access to municipal water and therefore cannot accommodate a necessary lawn sprinkling system.

SAU #9 Administrative Office – The SAU #9 Administrative Office building is located on Pine Street next to the John Fuller Elementary School. The two story building, originally a residential structure, was built approximately one hundred years ago and is home to the SAU #9 Superintendent and administrative support staff.

The building is in generally good structural condition, although it currently violates state health and safety codes due to the lack of fire sprinkler and alarm systems, as well as not being wheelchair accessible. To address these issues, the District has budgeted approximately $105,000 to renovate and enlarge the building in 2005.

10. Electrical Power

New Hampshire Electric Cooperative provides the distribution of electric power in North Conway, while Public Service of New Hampshire provides electric power in the remaining portions of the town. Kearsarge Lighting Precinct The Kearsarge Lighting Precinct is a small government body with two purposes: 1) to procure electricity for lighting along streets and public ways within Conway’s Kearsarge neighborhood; and 2) oversee the District’s Master Plan and Zoning Ordinance. The organization is run by three volunteer commissioners elected for three-year terms with the help of a paid elected clerk, treasurer, and a moderator (for its annual meeting).

In terms of its public lighting responsibilities, the Precinct purchases electrical power on an annual basis from New Hampshire Electric Cooperative. The cost of the electricity purchased is then passed along to Precinct households based on a percentage of the assessed value of their respective property. This amount is added to the precinct portion of the Conway property tax bill. The most recent assessment for the Precinct was $0.21 per $1,000 of valuation with an annual gross budget of approximately $14,000.

Intervale Lighting District

The Intervale Lighting District operates in the same fashion as the Kearsarge Lighting Precinct in that it procures electricity for public street lights in the Intervale area of Conway. However, the Intervale District does not have land use planning or zoning responsibilities. The most recent assessment for the District was $0.07 per $1,000 of valuation with an annual gross budget of approximately $2,400.

11. Telephone

Telephone service is available through any of the large telephone companies (Verizon, etc). High-speed broadband, dial-up and wireless internet service is also available (depending on local topography and proximity to switching facilities) through a host of regional and local providers including Adelphia, First Bridge Internet, Verizon Wireless, Third Rail Broadband Wireless Solutions, and North Country Internet Access.

12. Natural Gas

Natural gas is currently not available in Conway.

13. Cable Television

Cable television is available throughout Conway. Service is provided by Adelphia. Adelphia has also just recently introduced broadband services to North Conway and Conway Village.

14. Public Water and Wastewater Distribution and Treatment Systems

There are seven (7) utility/service precincts/districts[3] in the Town of Conway. Two of them - the Conway Village Fire District (CVFD) and the North Conway Water Precinct (NCWP) also provide public water and wastewater treatment services. Additionally, the Kearsarge Lighting Precinct and the Intervale Lighting Precinct are included in the North Conway Water Precinct and receive both water and sewer services.

The Town of Conway and the two Precincts/Districts providing water and waste-water services (Conway Village Fire District and the North Conway Water Precinct) are separate and distinct entities. While the Town of Conway municipal government is responsible for administering land use ordinances (i.e. zoning, subdivision and site plan review) and targets certain areas for development, the districts have the ability to make zoning work effectively within its boundaries by managing water and sewer distribution and expansion. System capacity can also be a limiting factor in developing certain portions of the town or restricting CHAPTER 8 development in other areas. Currently, the Town of Conway, the CVFD and the NCFD do not formally collaborate relative to development applications or development issues within Conway.

Conway Village Fire District (CVFD) – In 1999 District officials commissioned the preparation of the Conway Village Fire District Water and Wastewater Master Plan (Camp Dresser McKee [CDM], March 2002). The need for a comprehensive evaluation of the water and wastewater systems was based on incidences of minor contamination at existing well fields; low fire hydrant flows throughout the District; lack of wastewater collection north of the Saco River; and an aging wastewater treatment system which will probably be subject to more stringent discharge permits in the near future.

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan provides a comprehensive strategy for improvements based on the above issues as well as future growth projections and targeted development areas. Population projections (about 15% per decade) and associated District needs were based on the New Hampshire Office of State Planning projections for Conway Village.

Table 8-4. Conway Village FD Per Capita Water Consumption
Rates
Year Water Service
Area Pop.
Avg. Day
Demand (mgd)
Per Capita
Consumption (gpcd)
1995 2,480 0.40 161
1996 2,500 0.40 160
1997 2,520 0.48 190
1998 2,540 0.46 181
1999 2,561 0.49 191
Source: Conway Village Fire District Water and Wastewater Master Plan, 2002,
CDM

Water Consumption – The District provides water service to almost all of the households in the Village (about 3,714 in 1999). This represents about 30% of the households in the town. Current average demand in the CVFD is about 0.48 million gallons per day (mgd) which is significantly higher that most New Hampshire communities including the North Conway Water Precinct. (NCWP per capita water consumption is 71 gallons per customer per day [gpcd] while CVFD is 190). The master plan concluded that the water consumption rates do not necessarily reflect actual consumer usage (which may not include other factors such as system leakage) primarily because connections are not metered and water bills are based on a flat rate with no incentive for water conservation. Typically, per capita consumption rates range between 75-100 gpcd. Table 8-4 illustrates per capita water consumption rates for residents served by the CVFD.

Water Supply and Treatment – The District relies on two gravel-packed wells, located adjacent to the Kancamangus Highway. These wells were developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The capacities for Wells 1 and 2 are 1.22 and 0.72 million gallons per day (mgd), respectively. The CVFD is presently unable to meet maximum daily demand if its largest supply source were to go offline. However, if water consumption rates within the District were reduced, the CVFD would be able to meet typical daily demand should the major source go offline.

There is about 17 miles of pipe in the District ranging in size from 4 to 12 inches. Approximately 50% of the District’s mains are 6-inches in diameter or smaller.

Wastewater Service – In 2000, approximately 50% of the District’s 2,580 residents were served by the wastewater collection system. The District is currently planning to provide sewerage to all of Conway Village. The Distirct also receives treated groundwater from the Kearsarge Metallurgical Corporation (KMC), which is a designated Superfund Site with groundwater contamination resulting from on-site disposal of hazardous materials.

The wastewater treatment facility was constructed in 1972 and expanded in 1990, increasing the capacity from about 0.2 mgd to 0.36 mgd. The effluent is treated and disinfected prior to discharge into the Saco River just downstream from the confluence of the Swift River.

Key issues identified in the CVFD Water and Wastewater Master Plan about the wastewater collection and treatment system are as follows:

  • Wastewater collection is not provided for the area north of the Saco River;
  • The existing treatment plant has exceeded the design value for biological oxygen demand (BOD) loading and is within 80% of the design flow rate; and
  • The existing treatment plant will be unable to meet expected future treatment requirements (i.e. nutrient discharge limitations, likely to be mandated after 2007).

The oldest portions of the District’s wastewater collection system were constructed in 1972, when the wastewater treatment plant was constructed. The collection system includes polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and asbestos cement pipes ranging in size from 6 to 15 inches in diameter.

Conveying wastewater flows from the District’s existing service area to the North Conway Water Precinct for treatment is considered a possible comprehensive solution to Conway Village’s water and wastewater system problems. However, agreements must be reached between the two districts in terms of utility expansion and capacity needs, service rates and connection fees, and capital improvement financing. It is not anticipated that this connection will be necessary until around 2010 when new permit conditions will require upgrades to the District’s existing wastewater treatment plant.

North Conway Water Precinct (NCWP) – According to the NCWP Water and Wastewater Master Plan[4], approximately 48% of Conway’s population and about 400 residents of the Town of Bartlett live within the NCWP service area, which included a total of about 4,470 residents in 1998. The Precinct primarily lies along the Route 16 corridor and is densely developed with many commercial and retail establishments. The NCWP provides water service to almost all Precinct residents. The North Conway Water Precinct Wastewater Master Plan and Water Master Plan (both completed by CDM in 1999) provides in-depth evaluations of the Precinct’s existing infrastructure and future system needs, including the potential connection to the CVFD water and wastewater systems. Since the master plan was completed in 1999, several water and wastewater improvements have been made:

  • Completion of a 12-inch water main from Settlers’ Green to Artist Falls Road (Local Road);
  • Sewer service to the Artist Falls Area and the Woodland Hills/Northface Condominiums;
  • Completion of a 12-inch looped water main extension along Old Bartlett Road to the Mount Cranmore Area;
  • Sewer upgrades in the village area including locations adjacent to Seavey Street, Pine Street, Oak Street, Sweat Street, Mason Street, and Grove Street;
  • Designed plans for the upgrade to a 16-inch water main along Route 16 from Route 302 to Artist Falls Road, and from Artists Falls Road to the Hospital. (The plans are to be coordinated with New Hampshire Department of Transportation [NHDOT] highway improvement projects 5A and 5B); and Designed plans for sewer extension along Route 16 from the Hospital to 16A in coordination with NHDOT highway projects.

Water Supply and Treatment - The NCWP provides water service to all residents within the Precinct. There are two water service areas within the Precinct. The northern service area is supplied by the Hurricane Tank and extends to the north of Artist Falls Road. The Pine Hill Tank supplies the southern service area. Both tanks have a capacity of two million gallons, which is sufficient to service the Precinct’s current service territory over the next 20 years. Commercial and residential water demands are expected to increase by about 20% per decade. Table 8-5 indicates projected water demands for the existing Precinct area as well as potential future connections outside of the Precinct.

Table 8-5. North Conway WP Projected Future Water
Demands
Type of Use 1998 Demand
(mgd)
2020 Demand
(mgd)
Existing NCWP
Residential 0.20 0.30
Commercial/Industrial/
Institutional
0.32 0.48
Wastewater Treatment Plant
Use
0.20 0.20
Unaccounted for 0.39 0.39
Average Daily Demand 1.11 1.37
Maximum Daily Demand 1.72 2.28
Potential Future Outside Connections
Birch Hill & Forest Edge 0.10 0.15
West Side Road 0.09 0.16
Redstone 0.04 0.22
Lower Bartlett Water Prec. 0.14 0.65
CVFD (north of Saco River) 0.15 0.25
CVFD (south of Saco River) 0.39 0.56
Source: NCWP Water Master Plan, CDM, December 1999

The Precinct has five gravel packed water supply wells. However, only three are anticipated to be in use over the next 20 years. Well 1 is out of service because hydrocarbons have been detected in the well and Well 2 is threatened by the encroachment of the Saco River, which is eroding on the adjacent riverbank. The main contamination threat to the Precinct wells is from underground storage tanks. However, the planned extension of sewers to the Hussey Well Field wellhead protection area will help protect groundwater quality. There were three areas identified in the NCWP Water and Wastewater Master Plan where fire hydrant flows were determined to be insufficient: Fox Ridge & Route 16; Artist Falls and Thompson Road; Old Bartlett Road & Cranmore Road. The Precinct has been making upgrades in these areas over the past few years and has made substantial improvements to fire flows.

Wastewater Service - The North Conway wastewater treatment facility was constructed in 1997 and is located on the Saco River about four miles upstream from the CVFD wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This is a tertiary treatment plant (subsurface) providing advanced treatment in order to preserve the water quality of the Saco River, which is designated as a Class “A” waterway at the Maine state line. By discharging effluent within the subsurface, the Precinct avoids seasonal discharge restrictions (during summer months and periods of low flow) associated with the Saco River, which also may apply to the CVFD facility in the future.

Table 8-6. North Conway Water Precinct Estimated & Projected Wastewater
Flows
  Estimated Avg. Wastewater Flow 1998 (mgd) Projected Avg.W astewater Flow 2010 (mgd) Projected Avg. Wastewater Flow 2020 (mgd)
Residential 0.032 0.21 0.26
Commercial/Institutional 0.167 0.36 0.43
Infiltration 0.028 0.06 0.07
Septage 0.005 0.005 0.005
Leachate 0.005 0.005 0.005
TOTAL 0.24 0.64 0.77
Source: NCWP Wastewater Master Plan, CDM, December 1999

The 1.5 mgd wastewater treatment facility was designed with adequate capacity to serve all of North Conway Village. However, only about 30% of the precinct was connected in 1999, when the plant was operating at about 24% of capacity. As shown in Table 8-6, the average daily flows are projected to be 0.77 by 2020 (including approximately 5,000 gallons per day of septage received and treated as of 1998). Therefore the plant has the capacity for projected flows from the Precinct through 2020.

The existing wastewater collection system was constructed over the past 12 years and appears to be in excellent condition with minimal inflows and infiltration. The collection system has the capacity to support planned new sewers within the Precinct over the next 20 years. To provide wastewater collection services to all residents within the Precinct, sewers would need to be installed in the following areas:

  • Area north of Intervale Crossroads
  • Intervale Crossroads Area
  • Cranmore and Crown Ridge Road Area
  • Side streets between Route 302 and Artist Falls Road
  • Redstone and Route 113
  • Portions of the North Conway Village Area

Other Water Service Districts - There are approximately 39 small community water systems registered with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) within the Town of Conway. Of these systems, eight (8) have been classified as “likely” to be connected to the NCWP water distribution system in the future[5]. Another ten community water systems are considered “possible” future connections to NCWP based on their proximity to the existing system. These systems include:

West Side Road - NHDES has identified four (4) community water systems on West Side Road that may benefit from a connection to NCWP if the water system is extended across the Saco River.

Center Conway - There are three small public water systems in Center Conway: Saco Forest Association (65 housing units), Saco Woods Condominiums (240 housing units), and Woodland Grove. While the CVFD is three miles from most residential areas in Center Conway, it is possible that these system and other areas of the village could be connected in the future. This area could also be connected to NCWP along Route 16.

Albany - The CVFD currently provides service to approximately 10 homes in Albany just west of the village and it’s possible to extend service in the future to connect three small public water systems that have had fairly high iron levels including: Almost There Restaurant, White Mountain Subaru, and Wildwood Development.

Non-Service Areas - There is a limited section of Route 16 between North Conway and Conway Village that is outside the boundaries of both the CVFD and the NCWP. Currently there are no residential or commercial developments along this section of the roadway, but it is anticipated that limited development could occur in the future. NCWP is evaluating this area for potential expansion in the near future.

Additionally, the North-South Road and the Route 16/302 bypass may generate new development in the Redstone area and the NCWP may consider extending water service to this area through an existing 12-inch water main stubbed at Route 302. The Precinct is also considering possible interconnections to the Lower Bartlett Water Precinct and the Conway Village Fire District to provide supplemental flows in the event of an emergency or fire.

15. Water and Wastewater Trends and Issues

Conway Village Fire District

Water System Issues – According to the CVFD’s Water and Wastewater Master Plan (CDM, 2002), the key issues for the water system that need to be addressed are the following:

  • The water distribution system is not efficiently linked and has a significant number of long dead-end mains, reducing system reliability and raising potential water quality concerns;
  • Storage facilities and supply sources are concentrated in one area of the district; and,
  • Fire hydrant flow requirements are not fully met at any of the Insurance Services Office (ISO) fire flow locations.

There is about 17 miles of pipe ranging in size from 4 to 12 inches, and approximately 50% of the District’s mains are 6-inches in diameter or smaller. Over the next several years the District will need to replace these lines with 8-inch mains at a minimum. Additionally, looping dead-end mains in the District would improve fire hydrant flows and water quality. As shown in Table 8-7, potential looping areas include the following:

Table 8-7. Potential Water System Looping Project in CVFD
Street From Street To Diameter (inches) Length (feet)
Thorne Hill Rd. Fairview Ave. 6 200
Jack Frost Lane Quint Street 8 300
Prospect Rd. Prospect Rd. 6 200
Muster Street Washington St. 6 500
River Street River Street 6 300
Source: CVFD Water Master Plan, CDM, 2002

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) maintains an inventory of potential and existing sources of contamination for public water supplies in for Conway Village that was updated in July 1999. The majority of contamination threats to the District’s wells are from underground storage tanks. The District’s two water wells are also vulnerable to accidental chemical releases that could possibly occur on Route 16 or the Kancamangus Highway. Inter-connection with the NCWP would address this issue. NCWP’s Pine Hill Tank is located approximately 4,500 feet from end of the District’s distribution system on Route 16. This could be used as a short-term supply in the event of high demand conditions, emergencies, or contamination events.

The CVFD Water Master Plan evaluated three possible alternatives to rectify current deficiencies in the water distribution and treatment system:

  • Connect to the North Conway Water Precinct’s distribution system;
  • Construct a new Conway Village water storage tank, located north of the Saco River; or
  • Extensive piping improvements, with no additional storage.

Wastewater Issues - The Conway Village wastewater treatment plant is about 30 years old and approaching the end of it’s designed life. Some equipment is experiencing significant wear and tear such as the aeration system. Given this and more stringent permit conditions anticipated to be imposed in the next seven years by the State of New Hampshire, the CVFD Wastewater Master Plan recommended minimizing significant capital improvements to the existing facility. However, upgrading the WWTP aeration system is an important short-term improvement. This would reduce the District’s energy costs and ensure that the plant continues to meet current discharge permit conditions.

Additional growth is projected in the area north of the Saco River beyond the current service area. Continued reliance on subsurface wastewater disposal systems in the area may cause the deterioration of local groundwater quality.

The CVFD Wastewater Master Plan evaluated three alternatives that could provide a comprehensive solution:

  • Convey flows north of the Saco River to the North Conway Water Precinct now and include provisions to ultimately convey all Conway Village flows to North Conway (when more stringent discharge limits are imposed);
  • Upgrade the sewage treatment plant (STP) in order to meet all future permit requirements, and convey flows from the north of the Saco River to the North Conway Water Precinct for treatment; or
  • Expand and upgrade the District’s WWTP in order to accept flows from north of the Saco River and to meet all future permit requirements.

North Conway Water Precinct

The North Conway water and wastewater systems are both in good condition and have sufficient capacity to accommodate anticipated growth for the next several years. However, there are several areas beyond the current precinct boundaries that could be connected and provide significant community-wide benefits in terms of natural resource protection, public health and economic development.

There are limited growth opportunities in the village area, which is bound by the railroad and Saco River to the west, Mount Cranmore to the east, and conservation lands to the north. Much of the land west of theSaco River remains undeveloped with a large portion situated within the floodplain, Echo Lake State Park, or the White Mountain National Forest. Residents in this area rely on septic systems and there are no plans within the near future to provide wastewater service to this area.

There are possible extension opportunities south along the “strip” in terms of infill, redevelopment, and open parcels on the east side of Route 16 behind existing development. North of the village area, along Route 16, there is a possible extension area due to the need to increase protection of the Precinct’s water supply watershed.

Potential wastewater services to areas outside the Precinct in the future include: Redstone (to serve new development along Route 302 and 113); Lower Bartlett up to the East Branch River (to protect the Hussey Well Field and LBWP well field); existing CVFD service area; and the CVFD unsewered area north of the Saco River. The cumulative flows of these areas, in addition to the Precinct’s own projected growth, would exceed all design parameters of the WWTP. However, the plant’s design and capacity ratings may be higher than currently rated and could possibly be re-rated to a higher capacity with minimal capital expenditures.

The Precinct will need to develop new water supply sources if it is going to supply demands outside the Precinct boundaries. Two new wells and pumping station upgrades could potentially increase the capacity from its current estimated level of 7,000 to 12,000 gallons per minute (gpm). The Precinct has recently identified a well site (#6) in the Intervale area that could provide a significant amount of water to accommodate future needs.

16. Implications for the Future

The snapshots of existing municipal services and infrastructure discussed in this chapter provide insight into the current operations and conditions of various types of municipal services. The needs assessment attempts to provide an understanding, on a comprehensive level, where each service or infrastructure provider is headed relative to perceived future needs. The decisions made relative to the town’s municipal and service infrastructure will have far reaching fiscal, environmental and social implications with regard to how Conway will function as a community in the future. As mentioned in earlier chapters, Conway’s position as a tourist and retail destination places additional demands on existing and future services and infrastructure. Planning for these fluctuations to ensure that adequate municipal services and infrastructure are maintained will be one component of an overall municipal system that will be required to preserve Conway’s existing high quality of life.

The continued growth of enrollment within the entire Conway School District has placed considerable pressure on the town’s educational infrastructure. A comprehensive facilities plan should be developed by the District to anticipate the town’s educational infrastructure needs over the next ten years.

Although Conway enjoys the benefits of having experienced and dedicated professionals using some of the best equipment in the County, there may be opportunities to better utilize fire protection resources. Based on interviews with each of the Fire Chiefs, it appears that the town as a whole could improve its fire protection services if the five separate fire districts/precincts were coordinated, at the very least, on an administrative and fiscal basis. At a bare minimum, purchasing agreements, drafted in the form of memoranda of understanding, should be initiated to purchase similar products, services, and equipment used by each of the Precincts/Districts. Although coordination has been attempted in the past, the potential administrative and fiscal advantages attained by an integrated fire protection system could be significant and therefore should be revisited.

In order to reduce overlapping zoning requirements and bureaucratic formalities, the Town of Conway’s Zoning Ordinance should be amended to include elements of the Kearsarge Lighting District’s Zoning Ordinance.

In terms of water and wastewater issues, the CVFD Interconnection Feasibility Study will address NCWP residents and property owners’ concerns that water and wastewater expansion to areas outside the Precinct may use existing capacity and limit future connection opportunities within the Precinct. If the Study determines that expansion can be done by using surplus capacity that does not limit service potential in existing areas, then both NCWP and CVFD should work with Precinct residents and property owners to inform them of the advantages of this interconnection to the larger community. Additionally, NCWP should continue to evaluate potential future funding eligibility issues if additional revenues are collected from new service areas outside the Precinct.

The Town of Conway Selectmen should also work with both the CVFD and the NCWP by informing residents and property owners in both service areas about the advantages of inter-connected water and wastewater systems in terms of resource protection and future economic opportunities; developing funding solutions that recognize the difference in tax bases and financing capabilities between the two service areas; and accessing state and federal funding sources that are available only through the town (e.g. community development block grants).

Map 8-1 – Mun. Infrastructure/Fire Precincts

[1] Camp Dresser and McKee. Conway Village Fire District Water and Wastewater Master Plan – March, 2002.

[2] Town residents may also access the North Conway Community Center located in North Conway. However, this facility is owned and operated by a private non-profit group which receives municipal funding and is therefore not included in this assessment.

[3] Conway’s utility/service Precincts/Districts include the North Conway Water/Fire Precinct, Center Conway Fire Precinct, Conway Village Fire District, East Conway Fire Precinct, Redstone Fire District, Kearsarge Lighting Precinct and the Intervale Lighting District.

[4] Camp Dresser and McKee. North Conway Water Precinct Water and Wastewater Master Plan. December, 1999.

[5] These are community water systems identified by NHDES where benefits exist in combining the connection during NHDOT roadway improvement projects